Detailed Mechanism Funding and Narrative

Details for Mechanism ID: 13749
Country/Region: Namibia
Year: 2013
Main Partner: Management Sciences for Health
Main Partner Program: NA
Organizational Type: NGO
Funding Agency: USAID
Total Funding: $0

>>Narrative for OCt 2011 Reprogramming: The AIDSTAR Sector II: Capacity Building Indefinite Quantity Contract (IQC) is a flexible mechanism that provides support across a broad range of HIV/AIDSrelated technical areas, particularly as they relate to building personnel and institution capacity to further sustainable implementation. AIDSTAR contractors for Sector II have demonstrated capacity to enhance management capacity skills and leadership of national and sub-national institutions to deliver integrated, sustainable HIV/AIDS services at scale. In 2010, the Office of HIV/AIDS, in collaboration with USAID/Namibia and the MOHSS, began a pilot to explore sustainable mechanisms for community-based health information systems. Called "centerships", the activity is largely financed by Headquarter funding. These funds are anticipated to be depleted by June-July 2012. However, the pilot will not be complete by this time; due to initial start-up delays. To complete the pilot, USAID/Namibia is contributing $150,000. Lessons learned from this activity will inform the MOHSS' efforts to strengthen community based health information systems, particularly relevant given the upcoming new cadre of health extension workers.

Centerships are community based initiatives that provide sustainable support to the community based information systems-- in terms of data collection and use by the community. The Centership is characterized by strengthening HIV and health information and referral links within the community as well as between the community and public and private facilities (as appropriate). In the development of a Centership, the community e

Funding for Strategic Information (HVSI): $0

>>Narrative for Oct 2011 Reprogramming: HIV and Health inforamtion flow from communities to the GRN is weak and inconsistent. As a result, morbidity and mortality-related events occurring in the community are not necessarily documented at health care facilities. Such information is critical for making programming deciisons, identifying service delivery gaps, and setting goals and targets. This routine community based information is critical to ensuring a coordinated response to the HIV epidemic as well as to monitoring the effectiveness of the Response.

To address this issue, Namibia is piloting the 'centerships' concept. Centerships are community based initiatives that provide sustainable support to the community based information systems-- in terms of data collection and use by the community. The Centership is characterized by strengthening HIV and health information and referral links within the community as well as between the community and public and private facilities (as appropriate). In the development of a Centership, the community establishes business model processes and procedures (including revenue generating activities) to ensure sustainability of the hub (e.g incentives for community volunteers to contribute data routinely). In so doing, this activity also attempts to explore ways in which communities can 'incentivize' volunteers as opposed to relying purely on NGO/donor support (which is declining considerably in the country). The centerships activity is supported by many partners. Of particular note is the Namibia Ministry of Health and Social service, who is playing a substantial role in training the CHWs from both communities, and the Peace Corps, who have provided volunteers to support the project in both communities. The two communities selected are: Rosh Pinah, specifically the informal settlement of Tutungeni and Onderombapa, in Omaheke. This activity is a continuation of a HQ funded pilot on the development of a sustainable community based information system model. HQ funds are anticipated to be depleted by June-July 2012. However, the pilot itself will not be complete by this time; due to initial start-up delays. To complete the pilot, this activity will contribute $150,000. Lessons learned from this activity will inform the MOHSS' efforts to strengthen community based health information systems, particularly relevant given the upcoming new cadre of health extension workers.

Specific tasks include: Supporting the MOHSS at the regional level to train and strengthen information flow from Community (Centerships) Health Volunteers, explore ways in which this mechanism could possibly link to the health extension cadre, provide business planning training and support to the Centership Committees so that they are able to 'incentivize' the community health volunteers, and disseminate final report based on the experiences of the two pilots.

Subpartners Total: $0
Cardno Emerging Markets: NA
International HIV/AIDS Alliance: NA